Black History Month: Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman

She stood all of four foot seven.

When Harriet Tubman escaped the bondage of slavery in Maryland, she became a “conductor of the Underground Railroad” and returned 13 more times to the South, rescuing over 70 friends and family.

Southern slave owners placed a high-priced bounty on her head.

Under the cover of night, knowing the terrain, she moved. Under her dress she concealed a six-shooter pistol.

I was the conductor of the Underground Railroad for eight years, and I can say what most conductors can’t say — I never ran my train off the track, and I never lost a passenger.
— Harriet Tubman

During the Civil War, she led and guided the Union Army in an armed raid on rice plantations along the Combahee River in South Carolina and liberated over 700 slaves.

After the war, in upstate New York, she was active in the women’s suffrage movement and served as the head of a home for newly freed slaves. When church officials who assisted in running the home demanded that all new applicants pay $100 to enter, Ms Tubman demanded that only those who could not pay be allowed to enter.

I had reasoned this out in my mind; there was one of two things I had a right to, liberty or death; if I could not have one, I would have the other.
— Harriet Tubman

February is Black History Month. For dreaming and doing, The Early College of Arvada honors the courage and leadership of Harriet Tubman.

Harriet Tubman, as she appeared on US postage stamp

Harriet Tubman, as she appeared on US postage stamp